Wednesday, 3 February 2016

Freezing Rain

This morning's freezing rain has manufactured a pebble effect on my east facing windows. A pretty novel for me but I pity the poor folk who must navigate slippery sidewalks and roads today.

Three colourful diners patronize my ice covered feeder.


This fellow amply brightens an otherwise dull day.


An American Goldfinch enjoying a mini nap in a sheltered spot.


A Cooper's Hawk searching the brush for hiding prey items.


7 comments:

  1. I just loved looking at these bird photos. Wonderful shots all. We had lots of freezing rain too and things were very busy around my feeders. I imagine such weather to be tough on the little living things.

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    1. Thanks so much for the shout-out, Jocelyn. I loved the video you posted of the fox pups playing with an apple. Is there anything cuter? I think not! Also really admire how cozy your kitchen is. I'll give the 'Mistress of Nothing' a read. How interesting about those ancient but yet viable squash seeds. Your blog site really is a cheerful production. Kudos!
      Your almost neighbour, Florence.

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    2. Hi Florence, thanks for your kind words. My blog is my therapy as is my other past times. Mostly I love making the connections with people, being a loner in real life.LOL

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  2. I am enjoying winter on your blog...love it that you put out food for those wild cats...on my wildlife blog if put "feral cat feeder" in the search it will show you how we feed them.
    Honey bees are out foraging...how are yours doing/

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    1. What a well thought out feeding station you and Jim made, Carol. Quite controversial comments in your feral cat feeding post. I've heard most of those opinions before. In my area, the biggest threat to wildlife is the removal of habitat to become crop land. Anyway, we all proceed with our own consciences.

      You asked about my honey bees, Carol. Sadly all of my four colonies stopped humming at the early part of winter. And it certainly wasn't the cold that killed them. I strongly suspect that varroa mites did them in. The Spring's autopsy will perhaps shed more light. I've already ordered a couple of replacement nucs and from now on I'll give my colonies oxalyic acid treatments each August if they fail the 300 bee sugar roll mite load test. We learn from our mistakes and by now I should be pretty darned learned!

      Thanks for your company and cheers for now.

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  3. I missed reading about your bees! I'm so sad. I love your birds. Wasn't that a strange start to February???
    (ツ) from Cottage Country Ontario , ON, Canada!

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    1. Yes Jennifer, I was too depressed to do a post on the loss of my honey bee colonies. In the Spring when I take the hives apart I'll write a blurb. My replacement bees will be ready in May or June from a local breeder who is also a provincial honey bee inspector.

      I agree that this winter is a wacky one. This season I've only used my snowblower once! Last winter was especially unrelentedly bitter. Life is just one surprise after another, huh?

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